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© 2017 Martin A. Shaw, RCA

PHOTOGRAPHY

Here are some shockers.

Site of a tragic loss of life. Tree failed in windy conditions and killed two people.

The oak failed in windy conditions. The owner used to swing his small grandchildren in tire swing that hung from one of the main scaffold branches. The black coating inside this white oak tree is residue from a fire that occurred after a lightning strike around 14 years before the tree failure in 2008. Fungal decay, wind and time ultimately lead to the failure.

The broken portion of the tree weighed about 10 tons and was about 3 feet in diamter.

This hackberry tree image was taken on May 3, 2006. On that day the owner was notified that the tree had less than a year to remain standing due to decay and a rotting trunk.

This is the same tree on July 23, 2006. There was only a slight breeze when the tree failed.

This northern red oak failed in gusty conditions killing two golfers. Inspection of the tree's interior revealed brown rot wood decay that cound not easily be seen outside the trunk.

Note the healthy looking foliage. This tragic loss of life might have been avoided if the tree had been thoroughly assesed during a routine inspection of the trees on the course by a qualified arborist.

Note the healthy looking foliage. This tragic loss of life might have been avoided if the tree had been thoroughly assesed during a routine inspection of the trees on the course by a qualified arborist.

A closer inspection revealed that the trunk had a large decayed area in the center and was structurally unsound.

A huge trunk section of this hackberry fell on this house after wind storm. Notice the green and healthy apearance of the foliage.

Closer inspection revealed that foliage, growing at the base, obscured a completely decayed buttress.

This type of decay is very common on this species of tree. Buttress decay is a common cause of tree failure.

Voids at the base of a tree can be signs of a severe structural problem.